Living on an oil rig | Up & Adrift

“For one week, you get the best of both worlds. You get to live just above the sea and be greeted by schools of rainbow trout every morning and you get to explore the underwater marine world day and night. As the only one of its kind in this world, up to 42 occupants can live on the dive rig at any one time.” – Michelle, Up & Adrift

Although it’s been over a year since I took my initial scuba Open Water course, it was something I loved doing, despite an initial attack of anxiety the first time I submerged.  Since that initial dive, the instructor was what made the course worthwhile, also spurring a desire to learn more about diving, perhaps one day even to a professional level. As fun as the act of diving is, though, another factor which adds so much to it is the environment in which you dive.  While I would certainly go back to Big Blue for a second basic diving course, that same island would become familiar very quickly.  But, there are also so many places available to try diving, which is where this Weekly Reblog comes in. Oil rigs, and abandoned ocean platforms in general, have an interesting history; the founding of the Principality of Sealand being among one of the more colorful.  However, this was the first I saw of one being used commercially for scuba diving.  And while the experience is all-inclusive, the author of the post told me the price for the 5-day course was nearly US$1150, a bit of a steep price for most budget travellers when a standard Advanced open water is usually 1/3-1/4 that cost. The post makes for an interesting read and some great pictures accompanying it of both the platform and the author’s dives.