Thai Coup: Returning to Lao, where it is more stable. | dorishimoda

“It is one day after the Thai military coup d’etat was declared. It was one day after that a 10 pm to 5 am curfew was declared. Rumors were flying in Lao about how Thailand’s unrest has now made Thailand unsafe to travel; about how the border crossing to Thailand are closed, etc.”
– Dori, dorishimoda

 

After months of political protests then supposed ends to them followed by rescission of those plans, random acts of violence finally began to break out early this year in Thailand.  The situation continued to be unresorlved, and in many ways escalted, until finally this past week, the military finally stepped in and declared martial law.  A nation-wide curfew now stands between 22:00-05:00 and the military have been keeping a closer eye on media broadcasts.

Speaking to both foreign and Thai friends who are still in Bangkok paints the picture that things are still safe for the moment.  But both groups seem to have a very different take on it.  While it has shaken the nerves of many of the foreign people I have spoken with, most of my Thai friends seem very nonchalant about the whole situation.  Even though a similar situation has happened as recently as 2008, it still seems they should be worrying a little more.

While most of the whole situation has been centralized in Bangkok, it is interesting to see how it is affecting other areas of the country, which is the topic of of this Weekly Reblog.  Two weeks ago, when I left Ubon Ratchathani for Laos, there was no sign at all of military or border restrictions.  However, the author, Dori’s story paints a much different picture from his home in Vientiane, Laos for a quick run over the border to Thailand, and then back in a mostly rural area.